Download b 737 Theory PDF

Titleb 737 Theory
TagsMechanical Engineering Electrical Engineering Machines Nature
File Size3.6 MB
Total Pages52
Document Text Contents
Page 1

BB73

Bo
S
 

37T

oein
Sys

 
 

7Th
 

ng 7
stem

heo

737N
ms

ory

7NG
s

ry

Page 2


 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

Page 26

25 
 

Hydraulic Reservoirs 

The 3 hydraulic fluid reservoirs are located in the front of the main wheel well. They are pressurized 
from the bleed manifold to supply positive fluid to the pumps, preventing cavitation and foaming.The 
standby system reservoir is pressurized through the B reservoir.These pressures (45 – 50 PSI) can 
only be checked on 2 gages mounted on the forward main wheel well bulkhead. Quantity of the A & 
B reservoirs is displayed directly through gages on the reservoir by a float type transmitter which also 
sends a signal to the DEU’s for display on the lower DU. The standby system reservoir only has a low 
quantity switch, which displays the STANDBY HYD LOW QUANTITY light on the flight control panel 
when < 50%. 
 
The A reservoir has a 20% standpipe to preserve fluid to the EMDP when a leak occurs at the EDP. 
The EDP is more likely to malfunction because of the engine gearbox mounted heavy design and 
higher capacity it puts out. (±4x) 
 
The B reservoir has a common standpipe for both system B pumps so when a leak occurs, fluid will 
drain the entire B reservoir until a 0% indication. In this case the B system cannot be pressurized 
anymore but the remaining 1.3 USG can be used for the PTU to operate the LE lift devices. A second 
standpipe at 72% preserves fluid to this level for both B system pump operation, in case a leak occurs 
while using the standby hydraulic system. 
Minimum quantity for the A & B reservoirs is 76% which triggers a white RF (refill) indication on the 
lower DU when on the ground and TE flaps are up, or no engines are operating. 
 
Besides that, when equipped with an update pin function to the lower DU on systems, there can also 
be a red dial indication when A or B quantities decrease to 0%, or increases to 106%. 
 
The pumps heated (case drain) cooling fluid return to the reservoirs, is routed through oil‐to‐fuel 
heat exchangers mounted on the bottom of the main tanks. To achieve enough cooling for on the 
ground operation, there should be at least 760 Kg of fuel in the tanks each.

Page 27

26 
 

The APU Starter/Generator. 

The APU is started through a starter/generator and when on speed transfers to an AC generator.  
The start sequence of the APU starter/generator is determined by the Generator Control Unit (GCU) 
which receives power from the Switched Hot Battery Bus. That is the reason why the Battery Switch 
must be in the ON position (switched hot battery bus energized) to operate the APU. When switched 
OFF, the Switched Hot Battery Bus and ECU become de‐energized which in turn shuts down the APU 
immediately without the regular 1 minute cooling cycle. (trips the generator off line and closes the 
APU bleed valve to unload/cool the APU prior shutdown) 
Strangely enough power to the starter is provided by either the Battery (28 VDC), or Transfer Bus 1 
(115 VAC). Both voltages are first changed/boosted to a whopping 270 VDC by the Start Power Unit 
(SPU), where after a Start Converter Unit (SCU) creates the 270 VAC which is needed to drive the 
starter/generator in the start mode. This signal lasts until 70% RPM where the SPU becomes de‐
energized and the APU becomes self‐sustaining and accelerates further to its operating RPM. 
When the APU RPM reaches ±95% the ECU commands the blue APU GEN OFF BUS light to illuminate 
as a signal that the APU generator can assume the electrical load.  
The AC generator consists of the same parts as the “regular” AC generator as described in an earlier 
post and can supply 90 KVA below 32,000 feet and 66 KVA at 41,000 because of APU load capabilities 
with low air densities.

Page 51

50 
 

Frangible fittings 

Frangible fittings are mounted in the rim of the main wheel wells to prevent a rotating blown tire to 
enter the wheel well. If it shears, only that side will freefall back down by relieving Landing Gear 
Actuator up pressure overboard. (4 green and two red indications) 
Note that we do have retract brakes through the alternate brake system (hydraulic system A) but 
when a tire blows there is a good chance that the brake lines will be substantially damaged causing 
the retract brakes not to work. 
 
Retract brakes (and nose wheel snubbers) are mounted to stop the wheels from rotating, hanging in 
their uplocks. A high speed rotating wheel would cause tremendous precession forces to the 
structure during a turn that’s why they are stopped after retraction.

Page 52

51 
 

Rudder(vertical stabilizer) load reduction 

As on most large aircraft the vertical stabilizer is one of the most fragile structural parts. It cannot 
withstand large loads caused by full rudder deflection at higher speeds and therefore is protected 
against those high forces. The 737 rudder main PCU receives input from the pedals through input 
levers and a feel and centering unit which moves the rudder panel by hydraulic system A & B 
pressure. Pressures will be at normal values (± 3000 PSI) when flying < 137 Kts, above 137 Kts a load 
limiter reduces system A pressure to 1450 PSI resulting in a ± 25% reduction of the total load on the 
rudder. The result of this reduction protects the vertical stabilizer against high forces at a higher 
speed, leaving full pressure and deflection available when needed, at takeoffs and landings for 
directional control. 
 
An example of the vertical stabilizer “weak point” is an attempt in 2001 to recover an A300 after 
being struck by wake turbulence and aggressive maximum rudder inputs which sheared of the 
vertical stabilizer. Also note that the vertical stabilizer was the only intact part of the Air France 447 
incident over the Atlantic. 
 
In the past of “my field of experience” I saw a vertical stabilizer of a P3 Orion totally being sheared 
off like it was removed with a chain saw when it struck a wash rack when the aircraft has been 
swapped around by a twister at NAS Jacksonville and when a P3 hits a power cable at Pago Pago 
Hawaii. 
 
Be aware of the structural design of your aircraft!!

Similer Documents