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Document Text Contents
Page 1

BQ
British Chess

Magazine
www.britishchessmagazine.co.uk

£4.20 November 2015 No. 11 Vol. 135

Karyakin Wins FIDE WC

Lilienthal and Fischer

What is the Zilahi Theme?

A Successor to Frank J. Marshall

ECF

M
agazine

of the

Year 2015

Comeback Kid is a Knockout: Sergey
Karyakin wins World Cup

Page 2

562 The British Chess Magazine

Photo credits:
Karyakin: Galiya Kamalova [CC BY-SA 3.0]
via Wikimedia Commons; Svidler: John Up-
ham; China: Yang-Fan Zhou

THE BRITISH CHESS MAGAZINE
Founded 1881 Monthly

Chairman Shaun Taulbut
Director Stephen Lowe

Editorial James Pratt, Shaun Taulbut
Photography John Upham

© The British Chess Magazine
Company Limited by Shares

Registered in England No 334968
ISSN 0007-0440

R

Newsdesk
[email protected]

Advertising
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[email protected]
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non-subscription correspondence only.

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BCM Subscription Department, Warners,
West Street, Bourne, Lincs,

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K

Coaching Needed?
Groups, individual instruction, game

analysis, all levels welcomed.

Tamas Fodor, rated 2491, is a
Hungarian Grandmaster, an English

speaker.

Contact him on 07466 834464

[email protected]

Rates negotiable

K

ECF
At the ECF AGM on 17 October the Chief Ex-
ecutive, Phil Ehr, was not re-elected, despite
standing unopposed. Commercial Director
Bob Kane also lost in the same manner. IM
Malcolm Pein was elected International Di-
rector following a recount the day after the
meeting. Full results can be seen at the ECF
website.

Candidates 2016
The Candidates tournament will be held
in Moscow from 10th–30th March. Veselin
Topalov, Vishy Anand, Hikaru Nakamura,
Fabiano Caruana, Sergey Karyakin and Pe-
ter Svidler will be joined by the sponsor’s
nominee Levon Aronian and, almost cer-
tainly, rating qualifier Anish Giri.

Page 28

588 The British Chess Magazine

What, in 2015, is the single most important
contribution that you have made to chess in
the UK?

Err … if I have made a contribution at all (smiles)
it has only been because I never gave up organ-
ising, giving opportunities to play chess. I have
run tournaments in England, Wales, Scotland,
Malta, Italy. All sorts of formats: Swiss, A.P.A.,
Teams – England versus China with Bob Wade,
Scheveningen, Rowson–McShane, UK–French
Champions, London Candidates. I was England’s
Olympiad Captain …

In the UK, the role of organiser and arbiter are conflated. I am more of an organiser who
has found himself controlling his own tournaments. This is something that is not found on
the continent.

What would you advise readers of BCM to do to improve their chess?
Play and read more. I think players compete but don’t study or train. A lot of young players
in my club have improved as a result of being taught the game by experienced coaches
who come from a chess culture in Eastern Europe.

And the reading part?
Don’t be afraid of reading classics: old books that have been algebraicised.

For example?
Anything by Irving Chernev, early books by Raymond Keene, Fred Reinfeld …

What about books by Barden?
‘Play Better Chess’ – that is fantastic! Wade, we can’t leave out Bob Wade …

‘Soviet Chess’?
One of the early game collections that I read.

What about for the more advanced and experienced chesser?
There are so many good books out there. Unfortunately, it is difficult to make recommen-
dations. ‘Simple Chess’ by Michael Stean, ‘Capablanca’s Best Endgames’ by Chernev, ‘Chess
Primer’ by Capablanca. Of the contemporary stuff, ‘The Steps Programme: beginner to 2200
series of lessons’ (Dutch Chess Federation). All the people I know who have used it teach
with great success. You will soon find yourself stretched, but also finding your own level.

Thanks for your time, Adam. Will quiz you again soon.

K

Adam Raoof

Page 29

The British Chess Magazine 589

Double Exchange
Sacrifices: Part 3

A Chistiakov
© BCM 03/66

We continue our discussions from last
month’s issue, p. 541. Black to move.

XIIIIIIIIY
9-+kt-+-t0{
9zpz-wpzp0
9-+-+psl+0
9+-v-+-+-0
9-+P+-Z-+0
9+Q+N+-ZL0
9PV-ZP+-Z0
9T-+-M-+R0
xiiiiiiiiy
1…R×d3! 2 e×d3 Rd8

Now Black, having completed his develop-
ment, threatens to win White’s d-pawn, while
White’s rooks are passively placed.

3 Bg2 c6 4 d4
In view of the pressure on d3, 4 0–0–0 is bad

because of 4…R×d3.

4…R×d4
4…B×d4 5 B×d4 R×d4 was also good for
Orlov. The second exchange-sacrifice fulfils the
objective of the first; Black’s two bishops exert
relentless pressure.

5 B×d4 B×d4 6 0–0–0 Nd7 7 d3 Nc5 8
Qc2 Qc7 9 Be4 Bh5 10 Rdf1 Qb6 11
Bf3 Be3+ 12 Kd1 Bg6 13 Be2 Qb4

13…Qd8!

14 Rf3 Bd4 15 g4 f5 16 h3 Na4 17 Rh2
Nc3+ 18 Ke1 c5

Preparing to occupy the a4–c8 diagonal with
the queen’s bishop.

19 Kf1 Qa3 20 Bd1 Be8 21 Qd2 Bc6 22 Rg3
22 Rhf2 was better.

22…Ne4 23 Qe1 N×g3+ 24 Q×g3 Qc1
25 Ke2 Bc3 26 Bb3 a5 27 g×f5 e×f5 28
Qe3 Qe1#

Orlov–Chistiakov, Moscow, 1964. And you
thought rooks were better than bishops?

To be continued…

Hacktive Chess
Noam Manella

[email protected]

More Insidious Ideas that Redesign Thinking

Computer programmers are required to as-
sign definite values to the various elements
which may arise on the chessboard. For ex-

ample, they have to give exact answers to
such questions as: How much is an open
file worth? What is the value of the sev-

Page 55

The British Chess Magazine 615

XIIIIIIIIY
9-+-+-tk+0{
9z-T-+pzp0
9-+-+l+-+0
9+-+-Z-+-0
9-+-+-+-+0
9SL+n+-+-0
9P+-+rZPZ0
9+-+-+RM-0
xiiiiiiiiy
18…a5!?

Perhaps trying to win. There were other routes,
but it was clear they were drawish. 18…B×b3 19
a×b3 N×e5 20 R×a7 Rb8 21 Rb1 g6 22 Kf1 Ra2
23 Nb5 R×a7 24 N×a7 Kg7. Although White
has a passed b-pawn, it will gain the complete at-
tention of – and detention by – Black.

18…N×e5 19 R×a7 Nc6 20 Ra4 B×b3 21
a×b3 Rb8 22 Rb1 g6 23 b4 R×b4=. Here, Black
uses the back rank mate threat to advantage.

19 Ra7
19 f4 a4 20 B×a4 Bd5 21 Rc2 Re4 22 Bc6
B×c6 23 R×c6 N×f4 is OK for Black.

19…B×b3 20 a×b3 R×e5?!
There were two easier possibilities: 20…N×e5
21 R×a5 g6= or 20…Rb8 21 Nc4 N×e5 22
N×a5 g6=.

21 Nc4! Rb5 22 Rb1 Nc5
Both sides should have been moving their re-
spective g-pawns one square and then started
to play a bit more. Black’s …Nc5, while super-
ficially attractive, makes Black work harder to
achieve equality.

23 N×a5! Re8
Now both sides finally take a time-out for the
lufts.

24 g3 g6
The question now is whether White can escort
the pawn forward to b8. In contrast to the note

after move 18, Black here is more passively
placed, so it’s more difficult to defend.

25 b4 Nd3 26 Nc6 Re2 27 Rd7 N×f2??
A blunder. He doesn’t see the danger in the
knight coming back to fork the two rooks. Ouch!

Black could have gone with: 27…Rb6 28 R×d3
R×c6 29 b5 Rb6 30 Ra3 Re5 31 Ra5. The White
pawn is advanced and defended, but now what?
How would the white king be able to help as
Black seems to be able to cut him off?

28 Nd4! Nh3+ 29 Kh1
Going the other way is fatal for White: 29 Kf1 Rf2+
30 Ke1 Re5+ 31 Kd1 Re8 32 b5 R×h2 33 b6
Nf2+ 34 Kc2 (34 Kc1 Nd3+ 35 Kd1 Re1#) 34…
Ne4+ 35 Kc1 Nc3 36 Nf3 Rh1+ 37 Kc2 N×b1.

29…Nf2+ 30 Kg2 Nd1+ 31 N×e2 1–0

It’s clear that 4 d4 against the Two Knights
Defence yields an equal game with lots of
little bumps in the road for both sides. It
could explain the willingness for several top
level players to try 4 Ng5, Tarrasch’s “duf-
fer’s move.” More about that another time!

Endgame Studies Solutions
(see p. 564)
(Roycroft)
1 Rf5 Bg6 2 h8Q B×h8 3 Ke3 Bg7 4 Rg5
Bh6 stalemate. 3…Kd1 4 Rg5 Bb1 5 R×g4
Kc1 6 Rg8 is drawing. 1 h8Q? B×h8 2 Rf5
Be8.

(Roycroft twin study)
(a) 1 g8R K any+ 2 Rg7 draws. Not 1

g8Q? Kc1+ 2 Qg7 Bb2 3 Q×b2+ a×b2 4
Kg7 b1Q 5 h8Q, when Black’s queen will
staircase up the diagonal with checks, give
check on f5 and mate on f7.

(b) 1 g8Q Kc1+ 2 Qg7 Bb2 3 Q×b2+
a×b2 4 Kg7 b1Q 5 h8Q and this time it’s a
draw because the white king has the square
h6 available. Not 1 g8R? Kc1+ 2 Rg7 Bb1 3
Kg8 B×g7 4 K×g7 B×h7 wins.

Page 56

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