Download Capablanca - Lasker Match 1921 [Capablanca, 1921] PDF

TitleCapablanca - Lasker Match 1921 [Capablanca, 1921]
File Size439.6 KB
Total Pages29
Table of Contents
                            DR. EMANUEL LASKER
Contents
Introduction
Jose Raul Capablanca
Dr. Emanuel Lasker
	Tournaments
	Matches
The Rules and Regulations
The Summary
GAME 1
GAME 2
	Lasker - Capablanca [D37]
GAME 3
GAME 4
GAME 5
GAME 6
GAME 7
	Capablanca - Lasker [D64]
GAME 8
	Lasker - Capablanca [D12]
GAME 9
	Capablanca - Lasker [D33]
GAME 10
	Lasker - Capablanca [D61]
GAME 11
	Capablanca - Lasker [D63]
GAME 12
GAME 13
	Capablanca - Lasker [D63]
GAME 14
	Lasker - Capablanca [C66]
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

The World's Championship Chess
Match Played at Havana






Between


JOSE RAUL CAPABLANCA


AND


DR. EMANUEL LASKER


1921

Page 2

2






The World's Championship Chess
Match Played at Havana


Between


JOSE RAUL CAPABLANCA


AND


DR. EMANUEL LASKER


1921





WITH


An Introduction, the scores of all the games annotated by the champion,
together with statistical matter and the biographies of the two masters.

Page 14

14

The Summary


Date Game Opening Moves Result Time
March 15, 16 1 D63 50 = JC 2:44; EL 2:35
March 17, 18 2 D37 41 = EL 2:36; JC 2:37
March 19, 20, 21 3 C66* 63 = JC 3:59; EL 4:20
March 23 4 D61 30 = EL 2:04; JC 2:16
March 29, 30 5 D63 46 +JC JC 2:55; EL 2:45
March 31, April 1 6 C66 43 = EL 2:30; JC 2:30
April 2 7 D64 23 = JC 1:22; EL 1:20
April 3, 4 8 D12 30 = EL 2:07; JC 1:48
April 6 9 D33 24 = JC 1:55; EL 1:37
April 8, 9, 10 10 D61 68 +JC EL 4:20; JC 4:20
April 13, 14 11 D63 48 +JC JC 3:00; EL 3:05
April 16 12 C66 31 = EL 2:05; JC 1:54
April 19 13 D63 23 = JC 1:05; EL 1:15
April 20, 21 14 C66 56 +JC EL 3:30; JC 3:40

Final Score: Capablanca 4; Lasker, 0; drawn 10. Number of games, 14.
Number of moves, 576. Time, Capablanca 35 hours 55 minutes; Lasker 36
hours 9 minutes; Total 72 hours 4 minutes.

Game numbers 4, 9, 12 and 13 were played in one session; game numbers 2, 5,
8, 11, 14 in two sessions; game numbers 3, 10 in three sessions.

Openings adopted: 10 Queen's Gambit Declined (D12-D64), 3 Ruy Lopez (C66)
and 1 Four Knights Game (Editor's Note: * Game 5 began as a Four Knights Game
and transposed to a Ruy Lopez).

Page 15

15

GAME 1
Capablanca - Lasker [D63]

15.03.1921 [Notes by J. R.Capablanca]

1.d4 d5 2.¥f3 e6 3.c4 ¥f6 4.¤g5 ¤e7
5.e3 ¥bd7 6.¥c3 0–0 7.¦c1 b6
8.cxd5 exd5 9.¤b5

A new move which has no merit outside
of its novelty. I played it for the first
time against Teichmann in Berlin in
1913. The normal move is 9.¤d3 ; but
9.£a4 may be best, after all.

9...¤b7 10.£a4 a6

10...c5 at once is the proper
continuation.

11.¤xd7 ¥xd7 12.¤xe7 £xe7
13.£b3

With the idea of preventing ...c7-c5, but
still better would have been to castle
with 13.0–0

13...£d6

Black could have played 13...c5 In the
many complications arising from this
move, I think, Black would have come
out all right.

14.0–0 ¦fd8 15.¦fd1 ¦ab8 16.¥e1

The object was to draw the Knight away
from the line of the Bishop, which
would soon be open, as it actually
occurred in the game.

16...¥f6 17.¦c2 c5 18.dxc5 bxc5
19.¥e2 ¥e4

All the attacks beginning either with
19...¥g4 ; or 19...d4 would have failed.

20.£a3 ¦bc8 21.¥g3 ¥xg3 22.hxg3
£b6 23.¦cd2

23.¦dc1 would not have been better,
because of the rejoiner 23...d4 etc.

23...h6 24.¥f3 d4 25.exd4 ¤xf3
26.£xf3 ¦xd4 27.¦c2 ¦xd1+
28.£xd1 ¦d8 29.£e2 £d6 30.¢h2
£d5 31.b3 £f5 32.g4 £g5 33.g3
¦d6!

Unquestionably the best move; with any
other move Black would, perhaps, have
found it impossible to draw.

34.¢g2 g6 35.£c4 ¦e6 36.£xc5
£xg4 37.f3 £g5 38.£xg5 hxg5
39.¢f2 ¦d6 40.¢e3 ¦e6+ 41.¢d4
¦d6+ 42.¢e3

42.¢c5 was too risky. The way to win
was not at all clear and I even thought
that with that move Black might win.

42...¦e6+ 43.¢f2 ¦d6 44.g4 ¦d1
45.¢e2

45.¢e3 was the right move. It was
perhaps the only chance White had to
win, or at least come near it.

45...¦a1 46.¢d3

Page 28

28

GAME 14
Lasker - Capablanca [C66]

20.04.1921 [Notes by J. R.Capablanca]

1.e4 e5 2.¥f3 ¥c6 3.¤b5 ¥f6 4.0–0
d6 5.d4 ¤d7 6.¥c3 ¤e7 7.¤xc6
¤xc6 8.£d3 exd4 9.¥xd4 ¤d7
10.¤g5 0–0 11.¦ae1 h6 12.¤h4 ¥h7
13.¤xe7 £xe7 14.¥d5 £d8 15.c4

White has now a powerful position and
Black has to play with extreme care in
order to avoid drifting into a hopeless
position.

15...¦e8 16.f4 c6

This weakens the d-pawn, but
something had to be done to obtain
maneuvering space for the Black pieces.
Besides, with the advance of the f-pawn,
White's e-pawn becomes also weak,
which is somewhat of a compensation.

17.¥c3 £b6 18.b3 ¦ad8

Unnecessary. Instead 18...¦e7 was the
proper move.

19.¢h1 ¥f6 20.h3 ¤c8 21.¦d1

This is waste of time. In order to obtain
an advantage, White will have to make
an attack on the Kingside, since Black's
d-pawn, though weak, cannot be won
through a direct attack against it.

21...¦e7 22.¦fe1 ¦de8 23.¦e2 £a5
24.¦f1 £h5 25.¢g1 a6 26.¦ff2 £g6
27.¦f3

If 27.¥f5 ¤xf5 28.exf5 £h5 29.¦xe7
¦xe7 and Black has a good game.

27...£h5 28.f5

Of doubtful value. While it shuts off the
Bishop, it weakens furthermore the e-
pawn and also creates a hole on e5 for
Black pieces. The position, at first
glance, looks very much in favor of
White, but careful analysis will show
that this is much more apparent than
true.

28...£h4 29.¢h2

A blunder, made under time pressure
combined with difficulties attached to
the position.

29...¥g4+ 30.¢h1 ¥e5 31.£d2 ¥xf3
32.¥xf3 £f6

32...£g3 was dangerous and might lead
to the loss of some material.

33.a4

To prevent ...b7-b5. There are a number
of variations where White would regain
the quality in exchange for a pawn had
he played 33.g4 to be followed by e4-e5
and ¥e4, but the resulting ending would
be so much in favor of Black that the
course pursued by White may be
considered the best.

33...g6 34.fxg6 fxg6 35.¦e3 ¤f5
36.£d3

There are some very interesting
variations beginning with 36.¦d3 viz.,
36...¤xe4 37.¦xd6 £g7 38.¥h4 ¤f5

Page 29

29

39.¥xf5 gxf5 40.¦xh6 ¦e1+ 41.¢h2
£e5+ 42.g3 £xc3 and White is lost.

36...g5 37.¥d2 ¤g6 38.b4

White's idea is to change off as many
pawns as possible, hoping to reach an
ending where the advantage of the
Exchange may not be sufficient to win.

38...£e6 39.b5 axb5 40.axb5 ¦a8
41.£b1 £e5 42.£e1 ¢h7 43.bxc6
bxc6 44.£g3 £xg3 45.¦xg3 ¦a3
46.¢h2 ¦b7 47.c5

Forced, as 47...¦b2, winning a piece,
was threatened.

47...dxc5 48.¥c4 ¦a1 49.¥e5 ¦c1


The moves of this Rook are worth
studying. I believe that Black had no
better way to play.

50.h4

This brings the game to a climax, for
which Black is now ready.

50...¦e7 51.¥xc6 ¦e6 52.¥d8 gxh4
53.¦d3 ¦f6

The key to Black's defense, the holding
of the f-file.

54.¦d7+ ¢h8 55.¥d5 ¦ff1 56.¢h3
¤xe4 0–1

3hr. 30 - 3hr. 40

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