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Titlee3 Poison
TagsChess Openings Game Theory Traditional Games Games Of Mental Skill Competitive Games
File Size15.7 MB
Total Pages638
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Document Text Contents
Page 2

Contents

Title Page
Structure of the Book 3
Bibliography 6
Key to symbols used & Thanks 8

PART 1 – Introduction

1 The Post-Theoretical Era 9
2 An Academic Advantage 14
3 A Poisonous Repertoire 18

PART 2 – Indian Defences

4 Sneaky Grünfeld 23
5 Reversed King’s Indian Attack 36
6 Poor Man’s Benoni 61
7 Anti-Benko Gambit 85
8 Queen’s Indian and Bogo-Indian 97

PART 3 – Move Orders

9 History, Heroes and a New Trend 117
10 Move Orders 128

PART 4 – Junctions

11 Panov 142
12 Timid Tarrasch 174
13 Irregular Slavs 187
14 Chigorin 216
15 Dutch 226

PART 5 – 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3

16 Anti-Queen’s Gambit (Accepted) 243
17 Slav Nirvana 257

PART 6 – 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3

18 Queen’s Gambit Accepted 265
19 Queen’s Gambit Declined 286
20 Slow Slav 298
21 Miscellaneous 309

PART 7 – 1.c4 e5 & 1.e3 e5

Page 319

a) Miss Meran: 4...e6 5.d4, when White plays to restrict the light-squared bishop on c8.
b) ...a6 Slav: 4...a6 5.d4, harassing the bishop when it lands on f5 or g4.
c) Schlechter Slav: 4...g6 5.d4, a solid but passive line.

The same positions can be reached after 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.e3 and

a) 4...e6 5.Nc3
b) 4...a6 5.Nc3
c) 4...g6 5.Nc3


Pawn Structures


Structure 1

Page 320

Black has four ways to develop the light-squared bishop. In order of probability:

a) ...d5xc4 plus ...b7-b5, ...Bb7, ...a7-a6 and ...c6-c5 (Structure 2).
b) ...Nbd7 plus ...d5xc4 and ...e6-e5 (Structure 3).

c) ...e6-e5: White gives Black an isolated pawn by taking on d5 and e5, and exchanges minor pieces – especially the

dark-squared bishop.
d) ...b7-b6 plus ...Bb7 and ...c6-c5. White should be ready to take on d5. If Black exchanges on c4 first, White takes

back with the b-pawn and answers ...c6-c5 with d4-d5.

White’s only pawn lever is e3-e4, but it’s not automatically good. Some possibilities:


a) If Black takes on e4 and can’t break free, he gets a passive position. Then c4-c5 is a standard move that seals the
fate of the bishop on b7. So if Black takes on e4, he wants to follow up with ...e6-e5 or ...c6-c5.

b) Black’s standard reaction is ...d5xc4 plus ...e6-e5. That undermines the pawn on d4 (no longer defended from e3)
and wins the c5- and/or e5-squares for the knight. Usually, White goes e3-e4 only if this option isn’t possible.


Structure 2

Page 637

Andrey Shariyazdanov – Valery Petukhov, Sochi 2004 146
Luc Winants – Gata Kamsky, Tilburg 1992 148
Axel Smith – Philip Lindgren, Malmö, 16th Jan 2016 149
Viswanathan Anand – Anthony Miles, Wijk aan Zee 1989 152
Veselin Topalov – Jordi Magem Badals, Pamplona 1994 154
Judit Polgar – Spyridon Skembris, Corfu 1990 156


Chapter 12 – Timid Tarrasch

Antoni Schön – Giorgio Gerola, Correspondence 2014 177
Michal Krasenkow – Nils Grandelius, Stockholm, 1st Jan 2015 181


Chapter 13 – Irregular Slavs

Axel Smith – Philip Lindgren, Tylösand, 16th May 2015 191
Levon Aronian – Alexander Morozevich, Asrian Memorial, Yerevan 2008 193
Alexander Grischuk – Alexander Morozevich, Russian Team Championship, Sochi 2004 198
Peter Heine Nielsen – Vugar Gashimov, Khanty-Mansiysk 2011 200


Chapter 14 – Chigorin

Olaf Teschke – Ulli Reyer, Nakenstorf 2008 218
Wilhelm Steinitz – Mikhail Chigorin, World Championship, Havana (10) 1889 219


Chapter 15 – Dutch

Ivan Sokolov – Predrag Nikolic, Bled 1991 230
Vladimir Kramnik – Pavel Tregubov, France 2002 231
Nils Grandelius – Lars Karlsson, Västerås 2012 233
Robert Kempinski – David Anton Guijarro, Essen 2014 235


Chapter 16 – Anti-Queen’s Gambit (Accepted)

Aleksander Mista – Jacek Tomczak, Najdorf Memorial, Warsaw 2014 246
Evgeny Tomashevsky – Surya Shekhar Ganguly, Aeroflot Open 2007 248


Chapter 17 – Slav Nirvana

Pablo San Segundo Carrillo – Bin Sattar Reefat, Turin Olympiad 2006 259

Chapter 18 – Queen’s Gambit Accepted

Mikhailo Oleksienko – Henrik Teske, Dresden 2013 268
Alojzije Jankovic – Sergei Reutsky, Rijeka 2010 270
Ellinor Frisk – Martin Percivaldi, Skovbo 2014 273


Chapter 19 – Queen’s Gambit Declined

Axel Smith – Alon Mindlin, Budapest, 14th Dec 2015 288
Zenon Franco Ocampos – Alexander Goldin, Buenos Aires 2003 291


Chapter 20 – Slow Slav

Magnus Carlsen – Boris Gelfand, Wijk aan Zee 2012 300
Georg Rotlewi – Akiba Rubinstein, Lodz 1907 302


Chapter 21 – Miscellaneous

Alexander Graf – Zoltan Varga, Hungary – Germany, Budapest 2004 311

Page 638

Gennadi Sosonko – Hans Ree, Nijmegen 1977 313

Chapter 22 – e3 English

Grzegorz Gajewski – Jacek Tomczak, Polish Championship 2014 325
Alexander Grischuk – Anish Giri, FIDE Grand Prix, Paris 2013 327
Pavel Eljanov – Lazaro Bruzon Batista, 50th Capablanca Memorial, Havana 2015 330
Bill Richards – Gerd Heidemann, World Championship M377, corr. 1986 333


Chapter 23 – Exchange French

Igor Lysyj – Boris Savchenko, European Rapid Championship, Wroclaw 2014 348
Aleksandr Fier – Daniel Semcesen, Køge 2014 350
Nigel Short – Peter Heine Nielsen, Dresden Olympiad 2008 353

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