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TitleMANY MANSIONS BY GINA CERMINARA
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Page 2

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EDGAR CAYCE,

the greatest healer of our age, was so
shocked by his first vision of a "previous"
life that he rejected its significance. But
again and again "readings" of subjects by
this great clairvoyant uncovered ·past
lives-lives that would explain the sub-
jects' present dilemmas and conflicts. The
evidence in Cayce's files shows why he
bj~s~l£ fi~ally accepted the concept of
remcamation.

Dr. Cerminara's interpretation of Cayce's dis-
coveries has been a classic for nearly two
decades •. She~ searches all levels of human ex·
perience in the light of karma and reinC3l1la•
tion, offering compelling proof that each sonl
lives not once hut many times. And she sub-
stantiates again and again, with case histories,
Cayce's astounding accuracy in prescribing
cures for people he had never seen.

Sridhara Murthy
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Page 61

nation . of the nervous .condition. According to the reading,
the child had met a v10lent death in France during World
War II. Eager, t?ough, to take incarnation again, she had re-
turned to Amencan parents only nine months later. In so
short an intermission between lives the fearful memories of
bombar~ents ~d fires had not been erased; and they surged
upward m the child at the sleep level of consciousness.

Cases such as those just observed point unavoidably to ·an
7x~ati?n of the whole problem of memory. The first ob-
Jection raiSed by most people against reincarnation is the fact
t~at w~ do not remember our past lives. This is, indeed, a cu-
no~ crrcumstance, and yet not so curious after all when one
constders that we remember nothing of our infancy and little
of our c~dhood. <?onscio~ .memory is so tenuous a thing,
events shp by us wtth a flutdity so streamlike that to say "I
d? not remember" is not equivalent to proof' that something
did not occur. If we were to ask any of our friends, "What,
exactly, were you doing at 10:26 in the morning of April
5th, 1939?" we could stake our bank balance on the fact that
he could not honestly, and precisely, answer the question· yet
this lack of recollection of that point of time in his life by no
means proves that he did not live through it.

This objection to reincarnation, therefore, is easily met-
~t on the score that forgetting and repression of memories
ts a very natural and common human phenomenon and sec-
o~d, on the_ score that the nature of memory is such that de-
tails escape us but pri,nciples remain. For example any edu-
cated adult will be able to tell you that 7 times 7 'equals 49
and 12 times 12 equals 144. He will not recall all the unhap-
PY hours that he spent in third and fourth grade learning how
to perform these operations, but the ability to perform them,
and the knowledge of' the facts, remain as the useful resid-
uum in his mind of many repeated efforts of attention. ·

Similarly with man's caution as to fire, his wariness as to
dogs, hi;s. ability to dance, or his skill in performing anything.
The abiltty to walk argues clearly a period of time when
effort was expended in learning how to walk-though not
one out of a hundred thousand people would actually remem-
ber the specific and exhaustive efforts made in order to ac-
quire that skill. · ·
Fo;ge~ess of detail, then, ~oes not invalidate memory

of prmctple; and the answer of remcarnationists to those who
raise the lack of memory objection is that man's conscience
(or level of ethical insight) and his degree of intelligence and
CaJ?ac~ty represent t~e carry-?ver of sum totals from past-life
expenence, the details of which have escaped him.
118

The second and more subtle objection raised by the oppo-
nents of the reincarnation theory is that it is not ethical to
hold a personality responsible for deeds done by another per-
sonality. Consciousness of wrong, they say, surely should be
present if an offender's punishment is to have any real mean-
ing. The reincarnationists' answer to this objection is based
on what they believe to be the relationship of the personality
to the eternal identity.

The eternal identity-like an actor offstage-can remem-
ber all its past, but as soon as it takes on a personality, as an
actor takes on a role, then it is prevented by a protective pro-
vision of nature from remembering anything but the sum to-
tals or the principles which he had learned before. In a sense,
it compares with a Shakespearean actor who in his home can
recall scenes from any of the dramas in which he has played;
while he is acting Hamlet, however, the role of Shylock is
completely excluded from his mind.

Similarly the over-soul or eternal identity contains the re-
membrance of all things that have happened to it in all its
personality roles; but these memories are unavailable normal-
ly to the little personality (even in immediate afterdeath
stages) unless somehow, through some departure from the
normal, it taps the memory stream of the identity. Whether
this is done through the "unconscious" or the "supercon-
scious" is not of primary importance, though future investiga-
tion should be able to define more clearly the realms of mind
which these two terms represent. The point is that such a res-
ervoir of memory exists-no matter what it is called or
where it is located-and that it can be tapped in a variety of
deliberate or accidental ways. This, at least, is the view of
reincarnationists.

The objection that it is not ethically sound for an individ-
ual to suffer from something he did in his past which he no
longer remembers seems, in the last analysis, no more tenable
than the complaint that it is unethical for an adult to suffer
for unconscious conflicts established in infancy. Dynamic
processes' follow laws of their own. We must learn to con-
form our notion of ethics to nature as it is (and nature is su-
premely ethical) rather than expect to fit nature to the Pro-
crustean bed of our own preconceived ideas.

The blinders of forgetfulness which conceal the past from
us and cause us to see only the small segment which consti-
tutes the present are protective and necessary blinders. At
first glance this may seem an odd and improper provision;
but perhaps it compares to the system of locks which make it

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Page 62

possible for ships to travel from the Atlantic to the Pacific
Ocean through the Panama Canal. The locks may seem, to
the untutored mind, an awkward, cumbersome, and thorough-
ly unnatural device. But the engineers who contrived the sy~
tern had a difficult engineering problem to solve, namely the
conveyance of ships from one level to another, over extensive
terrain of differing levels of altitude. The means they used ex-
actly and excellently serve that end.

Similarly in the realm of consciousness. Consciousness, like
the water of the Panama Canal, flows in a continuous stream;
yet in order to facilitate passage of the vessel of individuality,
it is expedient that locks be dropped and water level be al-
tered so as to separate one segment of the passage from
another segment. This is the reincarnationist's answer to those
who object to reincarnation on the memory issue.

In addition to the instances of phobias and recurrent
dreams, there are in the Cayce files a number of other inter-
esting mental aberrations. Hallucinations, for example, are in
several cases attributed to the abnormal recall of past incar-
nations. In one instance the reading stated that there had
been the inadvertent opening of one of the inner centers or
chakras of the body, thereby causing the flow of the Kundali-
ni force and giving rise to hallucinatory impressions. (Cayce
was here using terms of Hindu psychology-the chakras
being the seven "wheels" or vortices of energy through which
the more non-physical part of man is, presumably, expressed
through the physical body; Kundalini referring to a force
presumably situated at the base of the spine which is intimate-
ly associated with the sex force and the creative power gener-
ally.)

Serious mental illness was in many cases attributed by the
readings to a purely physical cause, and some remarkable
cures were accomplished through purely physical means. One
case of this type has already been referred to in Chapter 2:
the case of the girl who returned to sanity on the removal of
an impacted tooth. Another striking case is that of a postal
employee who became disagreeable, mororse, .and increas-
ingly violent. His family persuaded him to go to a hospital
for a checkup. Medical examiners pronounced his condition
to be manic-depressive psychosis and he was commitle$1 to a
mental institution. A Cayce reading was requested by the
man's wife. The reading indicated that a fall on the ice many
years ago had resulted in a spinal derangement in the coccyx
area which had in turn reacted Qn the whole nervous system.
Specific osteopathic adjustments were recommended in con-
nection with some electrical treatments. The family succeeded
120

in having these treatments administered and in six weeks .the
man was pronounced normal and released from the. hospttal.
No karmic cause was indicated; if the fall on the tee had a
karmic source no mention of it was made. In any event, a
purely physicai treatment resulted in a cure.

In several cases, however, mental diseas~. was .ascribed. by
the reading to possession by discarnate enttties. Smce anctent
times it has been believed that some forms of mental de-
rangement are due to possession by evil spirits. Students of the
Christian Bible will recall that Christ is said to have caused
evil spirits to depart from a demented man! .and C:a!holics
will point to the fact that the rites of exorctsmg spmts are
still practiced by Catholic priests. . .

This whole idea is, of course, completely alien to. the vtews
of modem psychiatrists, who naturally regard the tdea ~s an
outworn superstition. Once it is admi.tted, ho~ever, that tden-_
tity can persist beyond death, there 1S no logtcal ~e~on why
such identities of an evil nature, could not mahc10usly at-
tempt to poss~ss themselves of, or otherwise influence, the
body and personality of a living person.

In the few cases of obsession which appeared in the Cayce
files, the recommended cure usually included electrical treat-
ments of some .type ("outside influences cannot stand the
high vibration") and prayer and meditation. In one case the
subject followed the recommendation c~oselr and .freed h~r­
self in several months' time of the whispermg vmces which
had disturbed her. In another case, the subject did not follow
the reading's prescription except with respect to one detail,
that of diet; no improvement took place. Apparently there
was a karmic cause operative in the first case at least: the
entity had in a past life used occult means to con?"ol others.

All of these cases point, perhaps, to new honzons .of un-
derstanding in the tragic field of mental abnormality. In
general, of course, the greatest significan~e ~a~ ~e Cayce
data holds for psychiatry and psychoanalysts hes m 1ts expan-
sion of the boundaries of the unconscious mind. In the few
examples of mt?ntal abnormalities cited here there i~ apparent
only the negative aspects of its content. However, 1t must al-
ways be remembered that the unconscio';ls is more than a
mere dark cellar of fears and horrors. It 1S a memory reser-
voir to be sure but a reservoir of both the good and the bad.
The' Cayce readmgs, in fact, call it the "memory. of the soul-
mind" in contradistinction to that of the body-mmd. Though
within this memory there are undoubtedly deterrent factors,
there are also factors of beneficent usefulness: Throu~h the
unconscious, for example, one can commurucate wtth all

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Set.·e~t\:dl-, NAL - '

tion of an accredited professional psychological staff, the re-
sultant body of case-study material would have all the eviden-

- tial force of the Cayce material, but none of its limitations
If reincarnation is indeed the law of life whereby man

evolves and becomes perfect-if this is indeed the simple
truth about man, the simple key to the riddle of existence and
of suffering-then all the theologies and all the psychologies
of man will be seen to be like the curiously wavering distor-
tions of the mirrors in an amusement park's Hall of Mirrors;
the simple truth will be seen to stand in' their midst like the
person whose image is so strangely being distorted.

Surely it is worth the attention of serious-minded men to
investigate a possibility the establishment of which could be
so clarifying, so lifegiving, and so transformative. If indeed
the soul of man has many mansions, now, of all times, is the
time we need to know that truth. For with that knowledge
comes a new nobility and a new courage. With it comes also
a new vision-prismatic and wonderful--of the universe; a
new understanding-subtler and deeper--of all human life;
and a new-tempered resilience for all the manifold perplexi-
ties, tragedies, and sorrows of life.

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