Download Max Euwe - Strategy & Tactics in Chess.pdf PDF

TitleMax Euwe - Strategy & Tactics in Chess.pdf
TagsChess Chess Strategy Abstract Strategy Games Traditional Board Games Competitive Games
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Total Pages175
Document Text Contents
Page 87

DIRECT MATE COM B INATIONS

It goes without saying that it is not possible to draw
up a scale, by means of which correctness or otherwise
would be evident ; but by watching these and similar
favourable or unfavourable factors, a good judgment for
combinations may be developed. The art of combining
accurately can best be learnt by carefully playing the
games through several times and by examining one's own
combinations and those of others. It is specially useful
for the development of combinative skill to play a certain
combination through several times in thought, w.ithout
moving the pieces.

A second example of an executive combination now
follows, in which the unfavourable position of the King,
owing to the dehiy in castling, causes the breakdown.

Diagram XXI

White to play

(Based on a game : Botvinnik v. Flohr ,1
Leningrad 1 933)

1 The above position did not actually occur in the game, but is only the comequencc
of the analysis of another move that Flohr could have made.

Page 88

82 MATING COMBINATIONS

Black has not yet castled and the white Rook is already
on the open K file, which involves great danger to the
black King. Yet it seems that Black can still save his
King in time : White's Q at Q B 3 is attacked, and if
White, for instance, plays Q x P, then Black can castle.
To take Black's K B P would cost a piece, e.g. : Kt x P ch,
K-Q I ; ! (White's Queen and his Kt at K B 6 are
threatened simultaneously.)

All the same, White has a winning combination by the
immediate collabor�tion of the four attacking units, Q,
K R, Kt, and Q P.

This combination is as follows :

I . P-Q 6 1 ! R x Q
Black had to take the plunge, as Kt x P ch, was now a

powerful threat. He had no time to bring his King into
safety : I • • • Castles ; 2 P x B, R x Q ; 3 P x R (Q) ch,
K x Q; 4 P x R, with material superiority for White.
The same would result from I . . . B-K 3 ; 2 Q x R ch,
B x Q ; 3 Kt x P ch, etc.

2 . Kt x P ch K-B I
2 . . . K-Q I ; would be easier : 3 P x B ch, and the black

King must retire to Q B 'f., either at once or later, 3 . . .
K-B I ; 4 P-K (Q) ch, R x Q ; 5 R x R ch. In either
case Kt-Q 5 ch, is decisive with a double check to King
and Queen.

3. P x B ch K-Kt 2

It is noteworthy that now 4 P-K 8 (Q), would have
no result : 4 . . . R-B 7 ! ; (threatening . . . Q x P ch ;
and mate next move, whilst the newly-created Queen is
still standing en prise). 5 Q-K 3, Q x Q ; 6 R x Q, K x
Kt ; and Black, with an advanced Pawn ahead, easily wins
the end-game. The combination, however, continues :

Page 174

END-GAME COMBINATIONS

3· ' " . . . . . .
4-. K-- Kt 3
S. K-B 2

R-Q S ch
R-Q 6 ch

Now the vertical resource on the file is eliminated.

s· . . . . . . . . . R-Q S !
A new resource : after 6 P-B 8(Q), there follows R-B

S ch ; 7 Qx R, stalemate (stalemate resource) .

6. P-B 8 (R) !

White gets a Rook so as to eliminate the stalemate
resource and threatens R-R 8 mate.

6.

7 · K-Kt 3 !

R-R S
Forced

Finishing with the double threat K x R, and R-B I
mate, which forces Black to surrender.

We have now come to the end of our discussions upon
combinative play. Let us once more repeat the methods
by which we can increase our combinative skill :

( I ) By careful examination of the different types and
by a clear understanding of their motives and of
their premises.

(2) By memorizing a number of outstanding as well
as of common examples and solutions.

(3) Frequent repetition (in thought, if possible) of
important combinations, so as to develop the
imagination .

Page 175

LIST OF EXAMPLES

Botvinni� � Euwe, Leningrad 1 934

Salve £1 Rubinstein, Carlsbad 1 907

Regedzinsky v Rubinstein, Lodz 1 9 1 7

Schlechter £1 John, Barmen 1 905

Rjumin v Euwe, Leningrad 1 934

Botvinnik v Alatorze1f. Leningrad 1 9 34-

Euwe f) Michell, Hastings 1 93 5 .

Rubinstein v Salve, St. Petersburg 1 909

Bogoljubow £1 Ru binstein, San Remo 1930

Reti v Griinfeld, Semmering 1 926

Euwe e> Noteboom, Amsterdam 1 93 I

Noteboom '(J Howell-Smith, Ramsgate 1 929

Alekhin v Bogoljubow, Villingen 1934-

Klaussen tI Leobschiitzer, Verein, 1 934-

Euwe v Kan, Leningrad 1 934-

Alekhin v Reti, Vienna 1 92 2

Alekhin f) Rubinstein, Carlsbad 1 9 2 3

Botvinnik v Flohr, Leningrad 1 9 3 3

Spielmann £1 N. N. .

Lasker � Bauer, Amsterdam 1 8 89

Nimzowitsch v Tarrasch, St. Petersburg 1 9 14

Euwe v v. d. Bosch, Amsterdam 1 934-

Alekhin £1 Sterk, Budapest 1 92 I .

Nisch � Woog, Leipzig 1934-

Nimzowitsch v Capablanca, New York 1927
I7I

90

94

9 5
97

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